Twin Cities taverns turn the cheeseburger inside out: 'Ooey, gooey sensation'

Date:

Join Fox News for access to this content

Plus special access to select articles and other premium content with your account – free of charge.

Please enter a valid email address.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive. To access the content, check your email and follow the instructions provided.

Having trouble? Click here.

Like almost any great local culinary specialty, the origins of the Juicy Lucy — or Jucy Lucy, as it’s known in one place specifically — are shrouded in hazy mystery.

Perhaps unique in this case, however, the dispute includes a disagreement over how this delicious tavern-food favorite in and around the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota is spelled.

Matt’s Bar in Minneapolis boasts the most solid and consistent claim to the original.

AMERICAN CULTURE QUIZ: TEST YOUR COMMAND OF STATE BIRDS, STATE SONGS, POP STARS AND POLITICS

At Matt’s in Minnesota, it’s spelled Jucy (no “i”) Lucy. The bar claims it invented the Jucy Lucy in 1954, as it dared to build a better cheeseburger. 

The cheese is packed in the middle of the beef patty, not on top of the burger. It creates a creamy volcanic flow of hot cheese when you bite into beef.

“The biggest thing is that when you bite into it, you get this ooey, gooey sensation when the melted cheese pours out,” Al Landreville, the owner of Sak’s Sports Bar in Vadnis Heights, Minnesota, told Fox News Digital.

The restaurateur opened Sak’s 16 years ago. The unique burger has been on the menu since day one. It’s been one of the pub’s most popular bites the entire time. 

MEET THE AMERICAN WHO MADE US FLIP FOR HAMBURGERS, LOUIS LASSEN, DANISH IMMIGRANT STREET-WAGON COOK

“Legend has it a customer came in and asked for his cheese to be put in between two hamburger patties,” food influencer Carrie Killian writes on EatingMinnesota.com.

“On the first bite of the burger, molten cheese came pouring out; the customer exclaimed, ‘That’s one juicy Lucy!’”

Menu at Matt's Bar

The “i” was dropped from the name, she offered, in “an inadvertent misspelling, and the Jucy Lucy came to be.”

“Molten cheese came pouring out; the customer exclaimed, ‘That’s one juicy Lucy!’”

Matt’s writes on its website: “Remember, if it’s spelled correctly, you might be eating a shameless ripoff!”

The unusual burger soon spread like hot cheese down the side of a Twin Cities burger bun.

The 5-8 Club, a former 1920s speakeasy in Minneapolis, also claims to be home of the local inside-out cheeseburger. 

HOT BEEF COMMERCIAL, A MINNESOTA COMFORT-FOOD CLASSIC, IS THE ‘MOST DELICIOUS THING YOU CAN EAT’

“Though no origination story exists about creating the cheesy conception,” EatingMinnesota.com reports, “they maintain they are ‘Minnesota’s Home of the Original Juicy Lucy.’”

The 5-8 Club counters Matt’s Bar with: “If it’s spelled right, it’s done right.”

Jucy Lucy at Matt's Bar

The Jucy/Juicy Lucy done right appears just as difficult as spelling it right, according to Landreville of Sak’s Sports Bar. 

He cited a laundry list of factors that go into making the perfect special burger. 

Many of those factors are secrets closely guarded by each Jucy/Juicy Lucy hamburger hotspot.

First, he noted, you need the perfect soft, melty cheese.

He did not reveal the cheese used at Sak’s. But trusty American cheese seems to be most common in these burgers. 

Matt's Bar

American cheese is perhaps even culturally required, given Minnesota’s heartland farm history. 

“We mix in a little green onion and some seasoning to give ours a little bit of a different spin,” said Landreville. 

The cheese is packed between 7 ounces of beef – two 3½-ounce patties sealed around the cheese with perfect precision. 

“You need to find the perfect chemistry of beef and cheese.”

Packing the cheese between the two beef patties is the moment of truth. 

The cheese needs to melt perfectly within the beef patties — but not leak out until the customer bites into the burger.

“You need to find the perfect chemistry of beef and cheese,” said Landreville. 

“When you bite into a Jucy Lucy, you want that ooey, gooey cheese to smack you right in the mouth.”

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.

Read the full article here

spot_img

Share post:

Subscribe to our newsletter

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.

Popular

More like this
Related

Hard Head Veterans Introduces the ATE GEN3 Ballistic Helmet

Posted 3 hours ago in Armor, Daily News, Helmets...

Galco Hawkeye IWB Holster for S&W M&P Shield/Shield Plus w/ Red Dot

Posted 20 mins ago in Concealment, Daily News, Holster,...

Russia: U.S. Dollar Is Becoming “Toxic”

The United States government announced a new batch of...