Wedding planning company launches AI tool to help couples ‘split the decisions’ for their special day

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Planning a large event such as a wedding can be stressful for many people, as decisions about ceremonies, location, guests, flower arrangements, cake designs and much more have to be made.

Zola, a wedding planning company that helps engaged couples plan details of their nuptials, announced the launch of a new tool to help couples struggling with making a myriad of decisions for the celebratory day. 

The “Split The Decisions” artificial intelligence tool will allow couples to provide expectations for the wedding planning process from the start, such as priorities, concerns, desired style and more, per Zola. 

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Then, engaged couples fill out a questionnaire in a “who’s more likely to” style to find out which person of the pair is more detail-oriented, creative and more. 

Some of the sample questions include, “Which of you is most likely to make a spreadsheet for anything and everything?”

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Another question: “Who’s more inclined to spend hours researching to find the perfect wedding detail, like the ideal centerpiece design or wedding cake flavor?”

“Many couples have proactively shared their own experiences about these challenges during wedding planning, wishing that they would have had this tool for themselves.”

From there, the new AI-generated tool then divides the key wedding-planning tasks between the couple. 

Zola AI tool

Although there will be joint tasks to accomplish, the individuals will be given a list of decisions that each of them is solely in charge of making. 

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Zola noted that the split to-do list is downloadable for the individuals to start chipping away at and making those decisions for their special day. 

“This tool is directly solving a pain point for so many couples.”

Zola’s chief marketing officer Victoria Vaynberg told FOX Business the tool was created due to the high number of decisions that need to be made during the wedding process. 

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“Our 2024 First Look Report found that the No. 1 surprise about wedding planning is the sheer number of decisions they must make,” she said. 

AI messaging

She continued, “The No. 1 societal expectation that they want to see change is the stereotypical assumption that one person will take on the majority of wedding-planning responsibilities.”

Vaynberg said the response from engaged couples has been positive — but they’ve also shared their vulnerabilities.

“Many couples have proactively shared their own experiences about these challenges during wedding planning, wishing that they would have had this tool for themselves,” she noted. 

Couple married and AI messaging

She added, “It’s a rewarding experience to know that this tool is something that is directly solving a pain point for so many couples.”

Couples looking to use the tool must have a ChatGPT Plus membership, which costs $20 a month.

Zola, which is based in New York City, began as an online wedding registry.

Today it includes wedding planning, website building, advice and more.

For more information on how to use the “Split The Decision” tool, anyone can visit Zola.com. 

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle.

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