In viral career trend ‘shift shock,’ employees find their new job not up to expectations

Date:

The phenomenon of “shift shock,” a viral career trend, is when a new hire realizes that the job he or she just accepted or the business the person has chosen to join is different than expected or what was portrayed during the interview and hiring process. 

The attitude is trending, as revealed in a recent study by The Muse, an online career platform, of more than 2,500 Gen Z and millennial job seekers. 

Almost three quarters of those surveyed (72%) stated they experienced a form of shift shock, based on either regret or surprise regarding their new job or employer. 

NEW ‘COFFEE BADGING’ JOB TREND HAS SOME BUSINESS LEADERS ON HIGH ALERT 

Kathryn Minshew of New York City, founder of The Muse, coined the term “shift shock” — and said the sentiment is a complicated one.

It can be attributed to employees having second thoughts about the new job and feeling their expectations weren’t in line with the reality of the position. 

“In an interview process, like in dating, sometimes one party sugarcoats or is less truthful about their flaws in an effort to get someone else to commit,” Minshew told FOX Business. 

“Other times, people fill in the blanks with their own wishful thinking — and then find out the other party never promised or communicated such things.” 

“I was looking for a name for the phenomenon of surprise or regret when a job isn’t as advertised.”

In any case, when employees feel the expectations created during the interview process weren’t matched by the reality of the job, things can get messy, she also said. 

YOU’VE JUST GOTTEN FIRED. HERE’S HOW TO FORGIVE YOURSELF AND MOVE ON

“Post-COVID, I started to see more candidates rebelling against the idea of staying in a place where they felt lied to or misled about the work environment, and instead voting with their feet by getting another job — or in other cases, giving the bare minimum in the role they had. I was looking for a name for the phenomenon of surprise or regret when a job isn’t as advertised, and I couldn’t find one. Hence, ‘shift shock,’” Minshew said.

What does other research say?

This month, Betterment at Work released findings from a survey of 1,000 full-time U.S. employees examining the state of retirement planning, access to employer-sponsored solutions and financial wellness. 

HOW READING A ROOM AT WORK CAN GIVE YOU A CAREER EDGE 

“This study found 45% of workers who quit in 2023 reported regretting leaving their job — and 24% of these workers said this was because they didn’t like their new job,” Edward Gottfried, senior director of product management at Betterment at Work in New York City, told FOX Business. 

woman at laptop

“These workers are experiencing shift shock.”

The phenomenon of shift shock happens when people dive into a new job and quickly realize it’s nothing like what was promised or expected, Gottfried agreed. 

“It’s not, in your mind, the job you signed up for,” he said. 

WANT A JOB IN A COMPLETELY NEW INDUSTRY? HERE ARE CRITICAL CAREER TIPS FROM EXPERTS 

“When the job turns out to be different, whether that be the actual work environment, responsibilities or the compensation package you were promised, it can be challenging to navigate, potentially weighing down on your satisfaction and motivation in the new role.”

What can people do to reduce the chances of ‘shift shock’?

Jeri Hawthorne, SVP, chief human resources officer, Aflac, who is based in Columbus, Georgia, said the interview process is the time to make sure a company’s offerings align with expectations.

“Candidates for new roles shouldn’t be afraid to ask questions that will help them make the best decision around joining a new organization or taking on a new job,” Hawthorne said.

She said candidates should hone in on whatever they prioritize in a job — whether it is career advancement opportunities, health care benefits, paid time off or more. 

busy worker on a. phone call

Going a step further, Hawthorne also said it’s acceptable for candidates to ask to speak with the people with whom they’ll be working on a day-to-day basis if that wasn’t part of the interview process. 

And finally, she told FOX Business that candidates should review their offer letter carefully, ask any clarifying questions and negotiate for additional pay or benefits before accepting the offer.

What should employees consider before switching jobs?

Workers should seriously consider what’s driving them to pursue a new job. 

“Most employees leave managers, not companies,” said Hawthorne. 

CAN YOU AVOID END-OF-THE-YEAR CAREER BURNOUT? JOB EXPERTS REVEAL SECRETS

“If it’s the direct manager, there may be an opportunity to resolve an issue without leaving the organization.”  

But for those seeking a new position, she said it’s often best for both the employee and the employer “to run toward something as an opportunity rather than away from a problem.”

Both employees and employers have accountability when it comes to shift shock.

If someone is looking for a pay raise, a promotion or better career advancement opportunities, that person may find those at a different company, Hawthorne also said. 

“However, if an employee is unhappy with certain policies or with their day-to-day work experience, they should talk with their manager or HR partner before looking into leaving,” she said. 

Laid off employee worker company

To illustrate this point, the 2023-2024 Aflac WorkForces Report found that employers are especially willing to make non-financial changes to mitigate employee workplace stress, shared Hawthorne. 

“For example, roughly two out of five employers say they would offer a more flexible schedule (41%), support work-life balance (41%) and allow working from home (38%) to reduce the stress of their employees,” she said.

Both employees and employers have accountability when it comes to shift shock, said Hawthorne. 

“Open and frequent communication — from both the employer and employee during the hiring process and once the employee is on board — is absolutely critical to ensure that both parties make the right decision,” she told FOX Business. 

“As our WorkForces Report reveals time and time again, communication can ward off many challenges employees have with their jobs, including shift shock.”

For more Lifestyle articles, visit foxbusiness.com/lifestyle

Read the full article here

spot_img

Share post:

Subscribe to our newsletter

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.

Popular

More like this
Related

Stimulant and non-stimulant drugs may improve cognitive function

Stimulant and non-stimulant medications prescribed for ADHD improve cognitive...

Annex Defense Launches Rubber Protective Case For Garmin Xero C1

Posted 1 hour ago in Daily News, Guns &...

Mission First Tactical Custom AR-15 Mags

Next Post Coming Soon...▶ It was back at SHOT Show...

UN Says Both Israel And Hamas Are Guilty Of War Crimes

The United Nations is now saying that both Israel...